Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Combat Techniques of Taiji, Xingyi, and Bagua: Principles and Practices of Internal Martial Arts PDF

Combat Techniques of Taiji, Xingyi, and Bagua: Principles and Practices of Internal Martial Arts PDF PDF Downlaod

All About Combat Techniques of Taiji, Xingyi, and Bagua: Principles and Practices of Internal Martial Arts PDF

The combat techniques of Tai Ji, Ba Gua, and Xing Yi were forbidden during China's Cultural Revolution, but the teachings of grandmaster Wang Pei Shing have survived. This comprehensive guide, written by one of his students, selects core movements from each practice and gives the student powerful tools to recognize the unique strategies and skills, and to develop a deeper understanding, of each style. It contains complete instructions for a 16-posture form to gain mastery of combat techniques. The book helps practitioners achieve a new level of practice, where deeply ingrained skills are brought forth in a more fluid, intuitive, and fast-paced fashion.

Combat Techniques of Taiji, Xingyi, and Bagua: Principles and Practices of Internal Martial Arts PDF Details:

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #571861 in Books
  • Published on: 2006-02-09
  • Released on: 2006-02-09
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Dimensions: 10.00" h x .95" w x 8.05" l, 2.05 pounds
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 400 pages

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Customer Review:

Most helpful customer reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful.
4good value and well written
By T. Ryan
This is really three books in one, and is quite lengthy and packed with a lot of information at 368 pages. The book is good for intermediate students in the internal martial arts of Xingyi, Baguazhang and Tai chi, who have been practicing one of these styles for a number of years, are now in the phase of "finding the hidden treasures" in their art, and who would like some exposure to the other neijia styles. The book is not a "how to" and assumes that the reader has some understanding of internal power, whole body movement, and chi flow. The first third of the book is a survey of the history and lineage of the three major styles of internal gongfu, plus a brief outline of tongbei quan and baji quan. Nothing new or controversial here, but fairly comprehensive and a good reference on lineages. The second third of the book is a survey of basic techniques, palms, moves, and steps from the various styles. It can't be comprehensive, given that the authors are discussing five different styles, but it points out the main techniques, how they overlap from style to style, and is intended as sort of a basic tool kit for internal gongfu. In that sense I think the authors succeeded quite well and a close reading will provide one or three good insights for nearly all neijia practitioners. The final third of the book is dedicated to a form developed by Lu Shengli that borrows from these major neijia styles with a discussion of the applications of all of the moves in the form. Now the standard disclaimer with martial arts books is that you can't learn a form from a book; however, given that the book is attempting a synthesis of the major styles, and the form is the ultimate demonstration of that synthesis, the presentation of the form is a bit disappointing here. As discussed by other reviewers, the third section of the book regarding the form is the weakest section of the book. The description of the movements is well done, however the form itself is very poorly illustrated which is a shame. The photos are taken outside so there are no reference points to use in the background, the footwork is not well documented or described, Master Shengli is dressed in a traditional large robe such that his palms are hidden many times, and the pictures are small and difficult to view clearly. If all of the pictures were sized like those on page 271, it would be different but in most cases the pictures are just too small and unclear even with a hand lens. However the written descriptions are better than average, and the applications are shown....... so you can reverse engineer the form with patience and practice, and of course use your own style and principles to develop a parallel series of forms along the line of the form presented.

I would like to congratulate Zhang Yun and Susan Darley on the translation, editing, and writing, which is a main reason for my 4 stars, as the writing here is far better than 90% of the martial arts books out there.

23 of 27 people found the following review helpful.
5Great book; misleading title
By L. A. Kane
This is a reasonably comprehensive and very interesting read. While the focus is on Chinese arts, practitioners of Japanese styles (like myself) can learn a lot from it too. The illustrations and photos are excellent, truly reinforcing the materials. The writing isn't first rate, a bit hard to wade through in places due to the translation no doubt, but it's more than adequate to communicate the essential materials.

The book begins with some fascinating history, principle, and background information about xingyi quan, taiji quan, and bagua zhang. There is a bit about tongbei quan and baji quan too, two styles I'd never heard of before. It then goes into the fundamentals of punching, elbow strikes, shoulder strikes, hip strikes, knee strikes, kicking, body alignment, and movement. The next section covers some basic applications and a good discussion of pushing hands (tui shou) and energy release (fa jin). The next section demonstrates a sixteen-posture form along with its applications. The final section goes in-depth into executing applications, important things like assessing an opponent, range, timing, direction, movement, and protecting your vital areas. There is a tiny portion about real fighting at the very end, but it is nowhere near complete or all encompassing.

Consequently, the title is a bit misleading. Combat implies fighting for your life on a battlefield, back alley, or similar situation. There really is very little about the nature of real fighting (as opposed to training, sparring, or tandem drills) in this book. There is absolutely nothing about important combat issues such as awareness, avoidance, escaping an ambush, evasion, escape, de-escalation, creating witnesses, navigating the legal system, trauma triage, weapons, or any other fundamental aspect of self-defense. There is, however, a lot of great material about fighting applications from the various forms. If that is what you are looking for, you've found an excellent resource in this tome.

Great book; misleading title. Recommended for practitioners of Chinese and Japanese arts alike.

Lawrence Kane
Author of Blinded by the Night, among other titles

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful.
4Loaded with useful information,....
By W.Kim
L.A. Kane's summary of the contents is pretty complete.

".... The book begins with some fascinating history, principle, and background information about xingyi quan, taiji quan, and bagua zhang. There is a bit about tongbei quan and baji quan too,... then goes into the fundamentals of punching, elbow strikes, shoulder strikes, hip strikes, knee strikes, kicking, body alignment, and movement. The next section covers some basic applications and a good discussion of pushing hands (tui shou) and energy release (fa jin). The next section demonstrates a sixteen-posture form along with its applications. The final section goes in-depth into executing applications, important things like assessing an opponent, range, timing, direction, movement, and protecting your vital areas. There is a tiny portion about real fighting at the very end, but it is nowhere near complete or all encompassing... There is, however, a lot of great material about fighting applications from the various forms. If that is what you are looking for, you've found an excellent resource in this tome. ..."

All I can add to his discussion is that the book also includes a good discussion of standing meditation postures used in Xingyi and Yichuan; and that the translators manasge to get across the author's sincere desire to pass on and underscore those points of practice that the writer found most useful in decades of practicing the internal styles.

My one big reservation is that however clearly the form is described, that section of the book needs far more photos of each movement. That so much care went into the text, it's a shame the authors didn't (couldn't) reinforce important points with more photos.

Otherwise The book is loaded with useful information for beginning and intermediate students. I am no expert (and I only skimmed much of the historical material) but I find the points of practice very interesting and very helpful.

To answer LA Kane's critic about the books scope I'd like to suggest checking out Tim Cartmell's books and videotapes on combat applications of postures in the internal style forms. For a sense of Cartmell's writing, and point of view, check out the entry on him in the book "Nei Jia Quan : Internal Martial Arts Teachers" or Cartmell's book, "Effortless Combat Throws".

See all 20 customer reviews...
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